Blog

Children categories

Wednesday, 01 May 2019 12:02

Mow Your Lawn, Not Your Feet!

Written by

Did you know that each year it’s estimated that over 35,000 injuries occur while mowing the lawn? At Superior Foot & Ankle Care Center we care about your feet and want to help you protect them. Most podiatric mower injuries can be prevented with common sense and a few precautions.

Start Safely

Have your mower serviced at least once a year to ensure safe operation. If you have purchased a new mower, be sure to read the direction manually carefully before using the mower for the first time. Do not mow your lawn when you are sick or extremely tired.

Take Precautions

Start with the right attire: wear long pants and work boots or other shoes made of sturdy material. Don’t mow wearing flip flops, sandals or open toed shoes and—hard as it is to believe that anyone would—never mow barefoot. Pick up sticks, rocks and toys before mowing.

Avoid Not-Smart Moves

There are several choices that will help you avoid injury:

  • Don’t mow a lawn when it’s wet
  • Mow steep slopes slowly from side to side, not up and down
  • Don’t pull a mower backwards while it is running

Keep Kids Safe

Lawn mowers are often like magnets for children. Make sure you set firm rules with your children so that they know not to come out to you on the lawn while you are mowing. Never give children rides on the mower. Keep the clip bag attached to the mower to avoid objects being picked up and shot out like projectiles while children are playing nearby.

Make sure that if you do get even a minor cut from the mower blades that you stop immediately and clean the area completely and apply an antibiotic ointment. If the cut appears not to be healing or gets warm, red around the edges or starts oozing, contact our Long Beach office immediately by calling: (562) 420-9800. Our podiatrists, Dr. Victoria M. Foley or Dr. Constance Ornelas will want to check your foot and see if an infection has developed.

Wednesday, 24 April 2019 11:59

What’s Behind Bunions?

Written by

At first, a bunion may appear very subtle. You may look down and notice your big toe seems to be leaning slightly toward the second toe. At Superior Foot & Ankle Care Center, we find many patients are unfamiliar with how bunions develop and therefore may not come in promptly to get them evaluated.

Know Your Risk Factors

Most often, bunions are caused by a biomechanical defect in your feet. This may be a neuromuscular problem, flat feet or overpronation. In many instances, this fault in the mechanics of your feet may be inherited. There are other factors, however, that can also increase your risk of developing a bunion, including:

  • Wearing tight-fitting shoes with pointy or narrow toe boxes
  • Spending long periods of time in high-heeled shoes or boots
  • A previous foot injury
  • Congenital defect
  • Repetitive stress to the foot
  • Arthritis

Seek Treatment Early

In its early stages, a bunion may not cause you any pain or discomfort. However, bunions are a progressive disorder. As time goes on, the big toe joint will move further and further out of place until it begins to cause pain when you walk. It will also become increasingly difficult to wear shoes due to the pressure exerted on the bunion by your footwear. The toe can eventually become rigid in the defective position and cause other deformities such as hammertoes to occur. It’s essential that you make an appointment at our Long Beach office so that our podiatrists, Dr. Victoria M. Foley or Dr. Constance Ornelas can examine your foot. Fortunately, there are many treatment options available which can slow the progression of the bunion and prevent foot pain and discomfort. These include:

  • Altering your activities to avoid motion that exerts adverse pressure on the bunion
  • Using a custom orthotic to correct the biomechanical problem and increase stability
  • Exercises to increase joint mobility
  • Night splints to realign the joint

If you think you have a bunion forming, don’t wait. Contact us today for an appointment by calling: (562) 420-9800.

Wednesday, 17 April 2019 11:58

Recognizing and Treating Rheumatoid Arthritis

Written by

As we age, many of us just accept joint stiffness and pain as an unavoidable part of getting older. But, at Superior Foot & Ankle Care Center, we want to encourage patients to bring those symptoms to our Long Beach office as soon as they start to notice them. Arthritis can be treated, and its progression can be slowed. It’s also important to have our podiatrists, Dr. Victoria M. Foley or Dr. Constance Ornelas examine your feet and properly diagnose your condition because there are multiple kinds of arthritis and they require different treatments.

Signs of Rheumatoid Arthritis

Arthritis is actually a category that contains over 100 different conditions. The two major forms of arthritis, however, are osteoarthritis (the “wear and tear” kind) and rheumatoid arthritis. Rheumatoid arthritis is the most serious of the two. It is actually an autoimmune disorder that causes the body’s immune system to attack its own cells. This leads to an intense inflammatory response within the body. Symptoms may include:

  • Joint pain
  • Stiffness
  • Redness and warmth at the joints
  • Swelling

These are also common signs of osteoarthritis. Patients with rheumatoid arthritis may notice additional symptoms, including:

  • Fever
  • Fatigue
  • Symmetry of symptoms—meaning that what is going on in one side of the body is also going on in the other side, i.e., joint pain will occur in both hands or both feet
  • Weight loss
  • Nerve damage that results in numbness or tingling
  • Decreased range of motion

Because rheumatoid arthritis is a systemic condition that can also affect other symptoms in the body, a patient with this disease will need a rheumatologist or other physician to coordinate and mange their care.

Podiatric Help

The foot doctor is part of the care team for a patient with rheumatoid arthritis will help with treatment designed to relieve foot pain caused by the arthritis. Some options may include:

  • Steroid injections
  • Accommodative shoes
  • Orthotics

If you have begun to experience joint discomfort, soreness or pain, it’s important that you make an appointment as soon as possible. Contact us by calling: (562) 420-9800.

Wednesday, 10 April 2019 11:56

Fixing Flat Feet

Written by

At Superior Foot & Ankle Care Center we treat many patients with flat feet. This common condition can be a source of ongoing pain and also cause swelling and a lack of flexibility in the foot. Oftentimes, people with flat feet also suffer from heel pain due to the biomechanical dysfunction that alters the structure and motion of the foot.

In some people, flattening of the arch begins during adolescence and continues into adulthood. For others, it is caused by Posterior Tibial Tendon Dysfunction or PTTD—a condition that has to do with changes in this tendon that provides major support for the arch of your foot. Other contributing factors to flat feet include:

  • Genetics
  • Weight gain
  • Injury or trauma
  • Aging
  • Arthritis

Getting Relief

Our podiatrists, Dr. Victoria M. Foley or Dr. Constance Ornelas will want to examine your feet and determine the source of the your deformity. If your fallen arches are not causing you pain, the foot doctor may just take a wait and see approach and monitor your condition. Flat feet is usually a progressive disorder and therefore is best treated sooner rather than later. Regardless of the cause, however, there are several non-invasive treatment options available. These include:

  • Icing the painful area
  • Anti-inflammatory medications
  • Physical therapy
  • Arch supports, braces or supportive tape
  • Custom orthotics
  • Rest
  • Choosing more supportive shoes

When these measures fail to bring relief or the arch continues to fall, surgery may become necessary. We offer flat foot reconstruction surgery that can provide a long-term correction of your fallen arches. If you are suffering with painful flat feet, contact our Long Beach office as soon as possible by calling: (562) 420-9800. The podiatrist will discuss the best surgical option for your specific case of flat feet and let you know what you can expect as far as results and recovery time.

Monday, 01 April 2019 11:55

10 Simple Steps to Healthier Feet

Written by

At Superior Foot & Ankle Care Center we want patients to know that being proactive about the health of your feet and ankles doesn’t have to be difficult or time consuming. April is National Foot Health Awareness Month and in its honor, we are providing these easy suggestions for taking care of your feet:

  1. Wash your feet every day with soap and warm water.
  2. Keep feet dry—change your socks if you sweat excessively. Dry between your toes after you shower. Dry feet are less likely to develop athlete’s foot.
  3. Don’t share shoes, socks, nail clippers, towels or other items that touch someone else’s feet.
  4. Inspect your feet regularly. Look for signs of foot disorders: swelling, redness, rashes, growths, lumps, discoloration of toenails and any cuts or wounds that are slow to heal.
  5. Don’t delay seeking treatment for foot and ankle pain. Most podiatric conditions will get worse the longer they go untreated. If you are experiencing foot pain or discomfort, make an appointment with our podiatrists, Victoria M. Foley or Dr. Constance Ornelas to get your condition evaluated as soon as possible.
  6. Get your foot measured professionally. Foot size can change during pregnancy and as you age. The majority of patients are wearing shoes that are too small for their feet.
  7. Wear shoes with good arch support. Many cases of heel pain and plantar fasciitis are caused by footwear that allows your arch to flatten, which in turn puts pressure on your heel.
  8. Stretch your feet. Flexing your feet, wiggling your toes and rotating your ankles all help keep feet flexible and promote good range of motion.
  9. Maintain a healthy weight. Many foot disorders are caused or made worse by being overweight.
  10. Apply sunscreen to your feet when they will be exposed—this means when you’re wearing sandals and open shoes as well as when you’re spending a day at the beach or pool.

Following these small steps will have a big impact on the health of your feet. To learn more about how to be proactive in the care of your feet, contact our Long Beach office by calling: (562) 420-9800.

It’s time for another sports season and we at Superior Foot & Ankle Care Center want to ensure that your child gets a safe start. Below are some do’s and don’ts to help prepare young athletes to have a successful and injury-free season.

Do: start by making sure your child’s feet and ankles are in tiptop shape. Get any lower extremity pain or discomfort checked by our podiatrists, Dr. Victoria Foley and Dr. Constance Ornelas. In addition to assessing the health of your child’s feet, the foot doctor will also revisit the site of any previous trauma to be sure there is no risk for re-injury.

Do: ask the foot doctor about any accommodations necessary for chronic conditions such as plantar fasciitis or weak ankles. The foot doctor may recommend specific shoe styles or a custom orthotic device for your child.

Don’t: allow your child to go from zero to sixty on the physical activity scale. Many injuries, like Achilles tendonitis and shin splints, occur when children go directly from a period of inactivity to intense workouts.

Do: ask the coach a few weeks before the season starts to provide you with stretching and conditioning exercises and suggestions for how your child can gradually build up strength and stamina for their sport.

Do: get the right shoes for the sport your child will be participating in. This may be the single, biggest step you can take to prevent sports injuries. Get feet measured professionally and choose shoes that offer the proper support for ankles and arches.

Don’t: allow your children to wear passed on sports shoes. Shoes do conform to the shape and gait of the person who wears them. Putting your child in someone else’s shoes may do harm to their feet.

Do: check the conditions of the field, track or other surfaces where your child’s practices and games will take place. Speak up if you notice cracked pavement, uneven playing surfaces or fields that have many holes and divets. These can all lead to podiatric and other injuries.

Don’t: hesitate to contact our Long Beach office if your child experiences pain or discomfort in their lower extremities as the season progresses.

Wednesday, 20 March 2019 19:36

5 Tips for Overworked Feet

Written by

Do you have an occupation that requires you to be on your feet for long hours at a time? At Superior Foot & Ankle Care Center we find that nurses, teachers, construction workers and other patients with jobs that have them upright and mobile for most of the day are more likely to have foot pain and swelling and are also at a higher risk for developing podiatric disorders. Although we can’t change your job, we can offer suggestions for ways to minimize foot pain and increase your comfort level.

Get Problems Checked Out Promptly

  • The majority of foot problems, such as plantar fasciitis, sesamoiditis, flat feet and metatarsalgia, are made worse by being on your feet for extended periods of time. For this reason, if your work requires this, it’s particularly important to not put off getting foot problems evaluated. Our podiatrists, Dr. Victoria Foley and Dr. Constance Ornelas will examine your feet to determine the cause of your symptoms and recommend the best treatment. The foot doctor may be able to suggest padding or an orthotic device for your shoes to help relieve foot pain. Be sure to let the podiatrist know that you have a job that requires you to spend long hours on your feet.

Choose Shoes Wisely

  • Your shoe choice is critical for comfort and protection. Choose styles with good ankle and arch support and a cushioned insole. It’s a good idea to alternate your shoes as well for maximum comfort and to avoid excess pressure to one particular spot on your foot.

Stay Hydrated

  • Although it may seem backwards, drinking plenty of water is one of the best ways to prevent painful edema or swelling of your feet and ankles.

Make the Most of Break Time

  • When you do get a break, get off your feet for as long as you can and elevate them if possible. Do some stretching exercises and flex your feet and toes. Once your break is over, try to change your position frequently. If you are unable to sit down, at least shift your weight from foot to foot.

Compensate During Non-Work Hours

  • Be sure to put your feet up when you get home from work. Choose exercise and fitness activities that don’t put additional strain on your feet. Swimming, biking and rowing are examples of physical activities that don’t put more pressure on your feet. Be sure to soak your feet if they are sore and treat yourself to a foot massage now and then to relieve pain and stiff muscles.

If you have additional concerns about your feet and your occupation, contact our Long Beach office by calling: (562) 420-9800.

Wednesday, 13 March 2019 19:35

Questions to Ask Before Your Podiatrist Appointment

Written by

At Superior Foot & Ankle Care Center we want all of our patients to make the most of their time in our Long Beach office. Our goal is to promptly diagnose your foot or ankle pain and devise a personalized treatment plan. Use the questions below to prepare for your appointment and ensure that our podiatrists, Dr. Victoria Foley, and Dr. Constance Ornelas have all the information they need to help you.

Where does it hurt? Knowing specifically the part or parts of your foot that are in pain will be the first step in determining your podiatric problem. It will also be helpful for the foot doctor to know if the pain is constant or intermittent and if it is sharp, stabbing, dull or burning.

When is the pain worse/better? Does exercise make the discomfort worse? If so, do bring the shoes that you normally work out in to your appointment. Do you notice that the pain is worst when you first wake up in the morning? What happens if you rest the affected foot?

What’s the history? If you’ve had a previous foot or ankle problem that you think is related to your current complaint be sure to bring any medical records, x-rays or test results to your appointment. The foot doctor will also want to get a complete medical history—many disorders can be hereditary.

Do you have questions? If there are concerns you have about your symptoms or questions about treatment options that you want answered, be sure to write them down and bring the list with you to your visit to be sure you don’t forget anything. You may also want to bring a family member or friend to the appointment to be sure you hear and understand all the information the podiatrist gives you.

A little prep work before your appointment will help the podiatrist get to the root of your foot or ankle problem more quickly. Don’t hesitate to contact us at (562) 420-9800.

Wednesday, 06 March 2019 19:33

Good Eats to Help Your Feet

Written by

In March, we celebrate National Nutrition Month. At Superior Foot & Ankle Care Center we believe that good nutrition has many positive benefits for your podiatric health. What’s the connection between what you eat and your feet? Read on.

Maintain a Healthy Weight—one of the most obvious benefits to eating healthy is getting to and then maintaining a healthy weight. Being overweight increases the risk and severity of many foot health problems, including:

  • Arthritis
  • Plantar fasciitis
  • Flat feet
  • Sesamoiditis

Many patients may not realize when it comes to your lower extremities, the pressure of excess pounds can be dramatic. For example, every pound you gain or lose exacts 4 times the amount of pressure on your knees.

Stay Active—in addition to the fact that it’s easier to be active when you’re not overweight, the foods you eat can also impact your energy level. Avoiding processed foods and those high in saturated and trans fats and sugars and focusing on lean protein and complex carbohydrates can increase your energy level and help you be more active.

Get the Nutrients You Need—good nutrition is about eating a varied diet. Enjoying a rainbow of produce, both fruits and vegetables will ensure that your body gets all of the many nutrients it needs. Certain fruits and vegetables like blueberries and red peppers can help fight inflammation, a common source of pain in podiatric disorders. Making choices that ensure you get the calcium you need from dairy products, leafy greens, and certain fishes will build strong bones—something that’s important to your feet since over a quarter of all the bones in your body can be found there.

Avoid Diseases that Harm Your Feet—your diet can lower your risk for certain diseases like diabetes, heart disease, and high blood pressure. Each of these conditions causes problems that can harm your feet such as poor circulation and neuropathy.

If you have questions about ways that your diet can improve the health of your feet, contact our Long Beach office by calling: (562) 420-9800. Our podiatrists, Dr. Victoria Foley, and Dr. Constance Ornelas.  We want to help our patients be proactive about their health and take the necessary steps to lead active lives.

Wednesday, 27 February 2019 19:31

5 Foot Symptoms and What They Mean

Written by

At Superior Foot & Ankle Care Center, we urge all of our patients to inspect their feet regularly and report any unusual changes to our podiatrists, Dr. Victoria Foley or Dr. Constance Ornelas. Sometimes, however, we find out that patients put off making an appointment at our Long Beach office because the change they’ve noticed just doesn’t seem that serious. Small changes can mean big foot problems, and your feet can also act an “early warning system” for diseases that can affect your whole body. Below are some changes in your feet and what they may mean:

  1. Red skin. Although short-term redness of the feet could just be due to temperature change or an allergic reaction to your laundry detergent, consistent redness can mean something more serious. Infections, such as athlete’s foot, can start with redness of the skin and an itchy rash. Consistently red or inflamed feet can also be a sign of the autoimmune disease of lupus.
  2. Black toenail. Unless you’ve recently stubbed your toe or you’re a runner, a black or discolored toenail is characteristic of a fungal infection. These may not be painful initially but will continue to progress and are contagious if not treated.
  3. There are several diseases which can cause excess fluid buildup (also called edema) in your legs and feet. These include: kidney or liver failure, heart disease and diabetes. If you are pregnant, a certain amount of swelling is normal but if in the last trimester of your pregnancy you experience sudden or excessive swelling, it may be a sign of a preeclampsia, a serious condition that requires immediate treatment.
  4. Cold feet. If your feet are always cold, regardless of the season or temperature, it can be an indicator of poor circulation. There are several possible causes for this, including diabetes, anemia and an underactive thyroid.
  5. Everyone gets a foot cramp occasionally, but if you are getting them regularly, it’s something to get checked out. In some cases, it may simply be a case of dehydration or a lack of certain minerals in your diet like magnesium, potassium or calcium. On the other end of the spectrum, however, ongoing foot cramps can be an indicator of nerve damage.

If you notice anything different about your feet or ankles—even if the changes are not painful or dramatic—contact us as soon as possible at: (562) 420-9800.

Page 8 of 23

Connect With Us